David Gordon’s Pure Dance: No Cynicism or Pedestrian Movement Around Here

By Susan Yung
Copyright 2001, 2017 Susan Yung

NEW YORK — It is a nearly inconceivable truth that David Gordon has been making dances for about 40 years. The truly amazing thing is that his recent premieres, as seen at Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church Friday, are fresh by any standard, without resorting to shock tactics or cynicism. And if you expect choreography by Gordon, a charter member of the Judson Church movement, to be banal and pedestrian, you’d be wrong. It is visceral, technically challenging, immensely pleasing dance/theater executed by performers equal to the task….

To receive the complete article, first published on January 8, 2001, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions); $99 when you order before October 15.  Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@@gmail.com .

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The DI, Year 1: Ripening Repetition– David Grenke Generates Detailed Dance

By Susan Yung
Copyright 2000, 2017 Susan Yung

NEW YORK — Well-crafted dance is difficult to imagine, but it’s one of those things that you know when you see it. As seen Friday at Pace University in the program of his Thingsezisee’m Dance/Theater, David Grenke crafts high-quality dance with parts that fit together perfectly. There are no indecisive filler steps, no confusion about where the gaze should be, no seams, and presumably plenty of rehearsal. Grenke’s phrases are taut, hermetic gems that withstand, and in fact ripen, with enduring repetition. A gesture’s impetus is often clearly diagrammed. The diaphragm fills with a puff of air whose ensuing breath starts a chain of tiny movements that travel from the center, up the spine, through the shoulder, and out the fingertips. In “Chasing His Tail – Volume II,” a premiere, Grenke’s shirtless torso could be a kinesiology textbook, clearly demonstrating the sound logic of his movement vocabulary. The smallest impulse is magnified tenfold and the quiet nature of this piece allows a similar magnification of emotion. The result is a contemplative, intense study of restrained physical and psychological power.

To get the rest of the article, first published on January 8, 2000, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1999 through 2015. Just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com , or write us at that address to find out about payment by check or in Euros. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $99 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com .

Flash Flashback, 11-30: Blister Me — Michelson & Muz Raise the Stakes

By Susan Yung
Copyright 2000, 2016 Susan Yung

(Originally published April 10, 2000. Julie Atlas Muz performs with husband Mat Fraser — who she met while both were performing in the Coney Island Circus Side Show — in their company Oneofus’s production of Jeanne Marie Leprince de Beaumont’s “Beauty and the Beast,” December 1, 4, 8, 9, and 11 at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art.)

NEW YORK — Sarah Michelson & Julie Atlas Muz fear nothing. To paraphrase the hot-button words they use to accompany “Blister Me,” neither the shallow nor the deep. They do not fear public scrutiny of their bodies; nor the failure of making perfect logic of an evening’s performance. Not getting right up into the audience’s face in a big primal scream, not even the smaller things, like slipping on a wet floor or landing from a fall onto a bare hipbone or spine. Nothing. The result is that “Blister Me,” their collaborative hour-long performance seen Friday at Dixon Place’s quirky theater at Vineyard 26, hits notes in every key and octave, high and low.

To get the rest of the article, subscribers can contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Purchase before December 15 and receive a second, free copy for the recipient of your choice — the perfect holiday gift. Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .