Back to the Future: How to access stories on the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager

Returning to its roots as a Direct E-mail List — as the most effective, efficient way to serve our subscribers, writers, advertisers, and readers — the DI will heretofore make all new content, as well as reprints from our 20-year archive of more than 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 writers of performances on five continents, plus news, commentary, art, and the Jill Johnston Archive, available strictly by e-mail. To subscribe to the DI and access both this new content and archived stories, for just $29.95/year individuals or $49.95 institutions, just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to find out about payment by check or in Euros. (In the latter case, the payments will be directed to our European correspondents.) You can also contact us at that address to find out about limited, well-integrated e-mail advertising options.

Advertisements

20 years of giving a voice to dancers: The Queen of Concept — Scheme Sabotages Style in Sarah Michelson’s “Daylight”

By Philip W. Sandstrom
Copyright 2005, 2018 Philip W. Sandstrom

Founded in 1998 by a collective of professional dance artists and journalists to build the dance audience, tell stories not told elsewhere, and give a voice to dancers, the DI is celebrating its 20th anniversary this week by offering one-year subscriptions for just $20, including full access to our archive of 2,000 reviews of performances and art from around the world by 150 leading dance critics. Subscribe through PayPal by designating your payment to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. The longtime technical director of Dance Theater Workshop, acclaimed lighting designer Philip W. Sandstrom is a DI senior critic.

NEW YORK — For her new “Daylight,” Sarah Michelson radically reconfigured PS 122’s second-floor theater, effectively dropping a new performance space into the midst of the old one. If you’ve performed in or observed performances at this space, you know the stage is bisected by two permanent columns; Michelson plopped the seating — three custom-seating risers — adjacent to and in between these fixtures. Then she painted everything — including the walls — white. The only exception to this snowy landscape was Claude Wampler’s four large portraits of the dancers, delineated, etch-a-sketch style, in a continuous thin black line on an all-white canvas. A phalanx of upright chrome theatrical lights, mounted on poles like speared heads, confronted the audience at the lip of the stage. A gentle haze thinly filled the air and the theater was bathed in natural blue-sky light pouring through a large exposed window on the south side of the auditorium.

To receive the complete article, first published on June 28, 2005, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? This week you can subscribe to the DI for one year at the discounted rate of $20. Just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI/AV Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading critics of performances and art on five continents from 1998 through 2015.