Judson, secret origins and exiles: The San Francisco / New York dance dichotomy

momajudsonhalprin smallFrom the exhibition Judson Dance Theater: The Work is Never Done, running at the Museum of Modern Art through February 3: Anna Halprin, “The Branch,” 1957. Performed on the Halprin family’s Dance Deck, Kentfield, California, 1957. (Halprin’s husband was the noted San Francisco architect Lawrence Halprin.) Performers, from left: A. A. Leath, Anna Halprin, and Simone Forti. Photo: Warner Jepson. Courtesy of the Estate of Warner Jepson.

By Christine Chen
Copyright 2000, 2018 Christine Chen

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Umakichi: More art from Ruth Asawa

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From the Arts Voyager Archives: Ruth Asawa, “Umakichi,” 1965. Printed by Jurgen Fischer. Lithograph. © 1965 Ruth Asawa. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas. 1965.196. Umakichi was Ruth Asawa’s father. First published on the Arts Voyager in 2012 and republished today in memory of Bill Clark, father, godfather, and friend of Ruth Asawa. Join the Dance Insider/Arts Voyager mailing list today and receive the complete story, with more art by Ruth Asawa, for free. Just e-mail artsvoyager@gmail.com.