Lutèce Diary, 31: Vote Origami!, or, Blood on the Metro floor

by Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2019 Paul Ben-Itzak

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PARIS — The inspiring thing about living in France during a European Parliamentary election campaign is the plethora of political parties (34 at last count — each accorded equal space) that sprout up on the cadenzas of steel placards installed in front of schools and other public buildings. What’s left this observer most incredulous ahead of Sunday’s vote (France holds its elections on Sundays, so more people can actually vote) is not the “Partie Animaliste” nor the “Partie Esperanto” nor even that the parties on the Far Right seem to have an easier time finding brown faces for their posters than those on the Left but that the slogans for the major parties or figures are so banal. Thus with Benoit Hamon — the Socialist candidate for the last presidential election who polled all of 6 percent and took his party down with him — we can count on “Hope Returning” if his new party “Generation” wins. (Which generation? French political parties aren’t particularly strong on nomenclature. A party calling itself “New Center” has had that name for 12 years.) And it’s certainly not the hashtag which makes Europe Ecology (the Greens; it was Danny “Le Rouge” Cohn-Bendit, the leader of the May 1968 student rebellion now retired from politics, who came up with that rebaptization) the party I’d vote for if I could vote: “Vote for the climate!” Okay…. exactly which climate would that be? I mean, who’s going to vote *against* the climate? Actually, I should have said “would have voted for until Saturday,” which is when I discovered the “Mouvement Francaise des Plieurs (Folders) de Papier” while heading out from the Marché des Producteurs de Vin on the Boulevard Reuilly and no, this was not a wine-tasting inspired hallucination because I didn’t have a drop, apart from the turnip and colza seed tapenade and okay, a nip or two of prune juice and more foie gras than a kid from California should probably boast of nibbling. And if it had been a hallucination, it would have owed more to the number of times I’d been folded, wadded, spit out and bled (that last literally) in the days before I stumbled onto the boutique of the MFPP and confronted its origami-filled window (with no cranes in site) after falling down a set of stairs onto the rue Coriolis in the 12th arrondissement. (Not far from the Bercy Tunnel, which a sign informs passersby was “re-imagined” by several students, all named and all female. After which I ate my canned couscous and tuna salad — recuperated in the book exchange box off the rue Jourdain in Belleville earlier — on a bench under a canopy of trees above the Yitzhak Rabin Peace Garden facing a ruin wall and above yet another dry water basin, this one dear to me because years ago my step-mother and I had lunched there with a water rat. If I could found a single-issue party in France I know what it would be and so do you. Votez water!) The boutique was closed, apparently for the “Events of Me,” the poster for one of which I hope it won’t mind me cribbing from an associated website page:

origami

First (being folded up and spat out-wise), there was the Belleville artist-activist on the rue Tourtille — 200 yards from where the Paris Commune made its last stand at the bottom of what’s now the parc Belleville– who’d promised to rent me, at 25 Euros a pop, a “petite chamber without door” which turned out to be a petite couch outside the bedroom without sleep, her non-artistic snoring keeping me up all night. When I brought her a bag of fresh croissants, pain aux raisons, and chocolatines (pains au chocolate to you, bub) on the first morning, all she could say was “You got crumbs on the floor” after I grabbed a couple for me as she was giving me the bum’s rush out the door. But the kicker was when several hours after I’d spent my whole morning writing and publishing a piece on an anti-BoBo demonstration the artist-activist and her five BaBa Cool (not to be confused with “BoBo,” “BaBa Cool” means “ageing hippy”) friends were holding Sunday, she waited until the last minute to tell me I had essentially no minutes — the timeline she gave me was physically impossible to meet — to get my back-breaking valise out of her atelier, and which meant that instead of being able to bring the suitcase to the cat-sitting up the street off the rue Belleville (the gig was starting that evening) after I’d retrieved my cat Mimi across town in the 13th arrondissement, I had to lug my Samsonite all the way across town and stow it at the friend’s where I was fetching Mimi, from which I’d then need to haul it back to Belleville when I had enough time to do so. When I tried to explain this to her, she held up her hands in twin peace signs. (Yes, this is the kind of person who starts an argument and then when you simply try to respond, holds up the peace signs to end the discussion, inverting where the violence is actually coming from.) Then there was the friend of 20 years, a specialist in American literature and film, who I discovered had more empathy for the American culture in the abstract than the suffering American in front of her, whom she put in a position where he faced a Hobson’s choice between breaking his hernia and sciatic-afflicted back again or something so dire I can’t even talk about it. (Or as I put it to her in a later e-mail: “I hope no one ever treats you like you treated me this afternoon.”)

The blood comes in, or spilled out, when I reached into the pouch of my back-pack (found in 2015 outside the anarchist bookstore up the street from where I was subletting on the rue Voltaire) inside the Metro on the Place d’Italie, after I’d deposed the suitcase and picked up Mimi, to look for my reading glasses so that I could actually understand the Metro map and figure out the shortest route across town to the cat-sit near the Place des Fetes, only to look down and see blood dripping onto the Metro floor, Mimi’s cage, my grey Marseille jeans, the (fortunately red) back-pack right under where two days earlier a pigeon I’d scooted away from my bench on the Ile St. Louis — where I was feeding a batch of ducklings and their mama after their heads had appeared one by one marching towards me from the ramp leading up from the Seine like a fleet of submarines slowly emerging on the distant horizon — had shat on it. The blood seemed to be spurting out from my hand; in my haste to fetch the glasses I’d forgotten that in my haste to evacuate the artist’s atelier I’d also stuffed two razors into the pouch. Tearing off a patch of toilet paper from the same pouch and hoisting Mimi over one shoulder and the large white bag barely containing her litter box, litter, and cat food over the other, I hurried towards the escalator to the line 7, on the way dropping a surplus bag which another passenger treated as if it contained a bomb. “YOU DROPPED YOUR BAG YOU DROPPED YOUR BAG!!” “IT’S EMPTY DON’T WORRY DON’T WORRY!” (This was actually the second bomb scare and the second evacuation and the umpteenth incident of being treated like an inconvenience and not a human being I’d experienced in two days. On Monday at the Gare de Lyon, the third train station to which I’d been shuffled just to change my ticket, as the French train company — or “Oui.SNCF” as its website has now been renamed; if the client is massively rejecting you, just change your name to “Yes” — continues to close up sales points with live people to chase its clients to the Internet so it can subject us with more advertising and hire less of them, after I’d waited for an hour with the incomprehensible take a number system the SNCF now has, the ticket-buying room was evacuated when no one claimed a small gray valise. I should add that later that evening, after my dentist appointment, at train station number four, the Gare de l’Est, I finally found a human being who agreed, after initially telling me “I can’t do anything, it’s the machine which decides,” like those Boeing computers which recently killed hundreds of passengers, that the ordeal his employer had put me through merited waiving the 12 Euro ticket change fee. Although the bandage in the middle of my front lower teeth — I’d just had a last tooth extraction — may also have had something to do with it.)

Speaking of blood — and getting back to the finger-cutting incident at the Place d’Italie — it was probably seeing the wad of toilet paper caked with blood that I was maladroitly holding around my forefinger that inspired the short-gray-haired lady across the aisle from me on the Place des Fetes-bound line 7, after glancing at me sympathetically a couple of times (making me wonder if I’d somehow managed to get some of the blood on my cheeks), to reach into her purse and fetch me a folded fresh paper handkerchief. “Merci Madame. Merci beaucoup.”

At this point I had to decide: Do I ask the cat-sitting client for a band-aid the moment I arrive, and thus make it more likely that she’ll figure out that the red swatches on my jeans and red drops on my back-pack are blood that I’m bringing into her house for 10 days — remember that at this point, with the denture back in the shop, I had one lower tooth — or say nothing and risk a finger infection? Fortunately the client provided a convenient segué when she showed me the plastic jug of lemon-wedge infused white wine vinegar with which she washes the dishes. “Speaking of vinegar, could I use some of that? I cut my finger.” “Certainly, but do you also want some argyle? The vinegar is fine as an anti-septic, but the argyle will close the wound.”

Which it and she did, physically and psychically.

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Lutèce Diary, 29: For sale, Lutèce or, They took Paradise (and San Francisco, and Brooklyn) and put up one large bistro

belleville maison d'air protestNot just a lot of hot air: Residents of Paris’s historic Belleville district, seen here protesting on a recent Sunday up top the parc  Belleville outside the shuttered Maison d’Air, are worried that the mayor of Paris wants to sell the space to a private concessionaire who will turn it into another BoBo bistro. Images courtesy Collectif for the Maison d’Air for Residents.

by Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2019 Paul Ben-Itzak

PARIS — Yesterday afternoon in a courtyard atelier on the rue Tourtille — not far from where on May 28, 1871 the Paris Commune made its last stand and where at 3 a.m. on November 14, 2015, when I was living in the same building, a distant car alarm awoke me to the news of the massacres — a group of artists and activists was busy making signs for an ambulatory protest Sunday against the ongoing privatization of Belleville, specifically talk of plans by the mayor of Paris to sell off the closed site of the Maison de l’air up top the parc Belleville just below the belvedere (offering one of the most spectacular views of the city, including the Eiffel tower) to a private concessionaire who will no doubt lease it to yet another restaurant (because G-d knows if there’s one thing we need in Belleville, it’s more restaurants). Or, as the collective “Convergence Belleville” put it when news of the mayor’s intentions first surfaced in 2017, ‘Yet another BoBo bar-resto in a working-class neighborhood where the residents have other needs,” one of the group’s recent suggestions being to make the site into a municipal museum for the 20th arrondissement. The arrondissment’s longtime Socialist party mayor, Frédérique Calandra, has countered — in a 2017 interview with the Parisian newspaper — that rehabilitating the building, in particular getting rid of the asbestos, would not be “cost-effective” for the municipality to undertake and that “the creation of a new place of activity in upper-Belleville will also allow us to re-enforce security in the sector,” which she said is mined by drug trafficking, begging the question of why retaining the site as a public forum (say, for activities serving the young people the drug dealers prey on) would not do this better than a privately held restaurant in a public space where you have to pay to enter. And Danielle Simonnet, Calandra’s opponent from the France Insoumis party in the last municipal elections, insisted, in an interview with the same newspaper, that “this project will only re-enforce the ongoing gentrification of the neighborhood.” Or, as another artist-activist and long-time Belleville resident put it to me recently, “They want to turn Paris into one big restaurant.”

belleville maison d'air manifesto

Poster for the ongoing opposition to possible plans by the City of Paris to sell the space now occupied by the Maison d’Air up top the parc de Belleville to a private concessionaire, who residents fear would turn the now public space into a private restaurant. 

I’ve seen this happen before first-hand, in Brooklyn’s Greenpoint and in San Francisco’s Mission District. First the Yuppies / BoBos/”Hipsters” are content to just alight in the neighborhood to eat, then they want to live there (which drives housing prices up and indigenous artist and ethnic populations out), then, as opposed to the truly ethnic restaurants and foodstuffs stores (Latino in the Mission, Polish in Greenpoint, Chinese and Algerian or Moroccan in Belleville), the generic BoBo / Yuppie / Hipster-geared restaurants move in, with their faux-hip (or faux-ethnic, in other words ethnic food made by white people) menus, often interchangeable. The restaurant “Thank God for broccoli” — that’s not my translation, it’s in English on the marquee — might sound to you like it should be in Brooklyn but in fact it sprouted up on the rue Piat down the street from the belvedere of the parc Belleville.

If rising housing prices not just in Belleville but across Eastern Paris indicate that it’s already too late, Versailles — er, the BoBos — has won (Bellevilloise artist friends tell me that a 60 square meter apartment off the rue Cascades recently sold for over 700,000 Euros or $820,00), in my own ramble late yesterday afternoon up the rue Fontaine du roi terminating on the Boulevard Belleville, before heading up the rue Belleville to Tourtille I found signs that food may actually save the neighborhood…. as well as the exact corner where, according to lettering on a bench outside the “Cantine de Babelville” situated there, the marriage between Belleville, then the second largest community outside Paris, and Lutèce was consummated in 1860. Although “consummated” is probably gilding the lilly. As Christiane Demeulenaere-Douyère observed, in “The ‘annexation’ as seen by Eastern Paris: Worries, hopes, and dissatisfactions” (Editions de la Sorbonne), reflecting community unease — including fear that food prices would go up! — with the planned annexation, the municipal council of Belleville actually voted against it in 1859, an expression of popular will the city of Paris promptly ignored, not only gobbling up the neighborhood but dividing it.

If the bad news is that like the rues Jean-Pierre Timbaud and Oberkampf which lead up to the boulevard Belleville before turning into the rues Couronnes and Menilmentont, the rue Fontaine du roi is littered with still more faux ethnic restaurants, crowned by a meta-bar / resto / “hostel” whose title is the only thing about it exclusively in French (the menu being dominated by Yankee English), the good news late yesterday afternoon, food and working-class ethnic populations-wise, came first in the Algerian and Moroccan French restaurants and bakeries setting their cakes, omelettes, savory and honey-sticky pastries, olives, and various peppery salads and condiments out on the sidewalks for the end-of-day Ramadan break-fast, and then at “The Paris Store,” my source for all num-nums Chinese and where, browsing the Ramen noodles racks for dinner (I’d walked all the way from the Meridian on the Left Bank after a long pause in front of the Fountain of the Four Corners of the World and was too tired to cook), I noted that certain flavors, predominantly fish and crustacean, had been highlighted with “Good for Hallal” signs…. Meaning the Chinese grocery store wasn’t marketing just to its own, but was taking into account the religious/dietary needs of its French Arab clientel for Ramadan. (I’d later pour my soup over day-old “Viking Bread” — I wanted to test out the fortitude of the new choppers — from the bakery at the corner of Tourtille and the rue Belleville which sells both Arab and non-Arab French breads and pastries.)

In other words, what may save Belleville is that more than I’ve seen in Greenpoint and the other ethnic neighborhoods of Brooklyn and even in San Francisco’s Mission District, these communities aren’t just catering to their own (and to the BoBos) but to each other. There’s not the inter-ethnic strife I’ve seen or heard of in other cities, e.g. between the Korean- and Black-Americans in South Central Los Angeles or even Greenwich Village. And the mayor should get some credit for this: When French Chinese commerce threatened to encroach on French Arab groceries, boulangeries, restaurants and butchers several years ago, she put a stop to it, in the name of preserving the neighborhood’s diversity.

This is also what I love about the twice-weekly outdoor market on the Boulevard Belleville: Squeezing through the crowds of French Arabs, French Africans, French Asians, and even a few BoBos, 99 percent of the time politely moving forward despite the crush, negotiating with the largely French-Arab fruit, vegetable, olive, date, pepper-filled crepes, cheese, fish, fresh mint, and merguez vendors — okay, le bouffe est aussi pour quelque-chose, the food may have something to do with it.

And it’s for the Maison d’Air site’s potential as a place of more inter-community exchanges — not another bistro — that the various militant organizations will be de-ambulating throughout the streets of Belleville and Menilmontant Sunday, beginning at 4 p.m. on the Place Gambetta. Or, as the Collectif for the Maison d’Air  for residents puts it on its manifesto (see above): “We dreamed of this place, and we will not renounce… we will not abandon our dreams. We want this place to be a place of sharing, of invention, of culture, of invention, of debates and fetes for the quartier.”