Flash Flashback, 12-1: Of gangs and gongs — Egea sings the body electric in hip-hop “Soli 2” while Gourfink dissects the ballet body in “Corbeau”

egea-hip-hop

Emilie Sudre in Anthony Egea’s “Soli 2.” Photo © & courtesy Jean-Jacques Mahé.

By Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2009, 2016 Paul Ben-Itzak

(Originally published May 27, 2009.)

PANTIN (Seine-Saint-Denis), France — Apparently to goose his party’s standing for the June 7 European Parliamentary elections, French president Nicolas Sarkozy just announced he’s going to send a couple hundred more police over here to this department (as French counties are called) on the outskirts of Paris to take back several areas which in his view have been over-run by gangs. I have a better idea: Instead of simply squashing all that youthful energy, how about re-channelling it into constructive, creative activities and ends? I propose sending those young citizens over to the Centre National de la Danse. Even if, when one enters its newish, somewhat cold concrete building on the banks of the Ourcq canal just outside the Paris perimeter, it may seem more like a library or hushed sanctuary than a place where dance students flock to get their technique pushed and dance fans to seek inspiring performances.

Justement, as the French say, it occurs to me that the audience at the CND May 27 for the opening of Anthony Egea’s putatively hip-hop solo “Soli 2” was predominantly white (the youth in Seine-Saint-Denis are predominantly colored, French of North African or other African descent) and, except for the kid two seats over from me who finally stopped squirming when the dancer Emilie Sudre took off her top (tastefully — her back was to us for most of this segment, and more about that beautiful back in a minute), predominantly older. And considering that this was a hip-hop solo and the lady was busting to move, markedly sedate. (Sometimes at the CND, I feel more like I’m in a science laboratory than in what is theoretically in part a national hub of experimentation for an art vivant; no hubbub here, bub!) But what if a bunch of those excitable youth from all over Seine-Saint-Denis were bussed over to the CND?

To get the rest of the article, subscribers can contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Purchase before December 15 and receive a second, free copy for the recipient of your choice — the perfect holiday gift. Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .

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red-shoes

Moira Shearer in Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger’s 1948 “The Red Shoes.” (1948). Courtesy MGM

By Harris Green
Copyright 2008, 2016 Harris Green

Originally published on December 18, 2008. Frederick Wiseman’s latest documentary profiles the New York neighborhood of Jackson Heights.

NEW YORK — Those New Yorkers who immodestly presume they live in the Dance Capital of the World had, for a few weeks this fall at least, good reason to believe they were living in the Dance Movie Capital of the World. On November 4, the ever-reliable SoHo triplex Film Forum broke the long drought of motion pictures about ballet by presenting the U.S. theatrical premiere of Frederick Wiseman’s 2-hour, 38-minute documentary, “La Danse: The Paris Opéra Ballet,” then showing two days later a gloriously re-mastered print of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s beloved 1948 high-camp classic, “The Red Shoes.” New Yorkers had been subsisting on such parched fare as Robert Altman’s “The Company” (2003), which even Altman seemed to have lost interest in before it was finished, and Nicholas Hytner’s “Center Stage” (2000), which sank under the dead weight of clichés. (Eight years passed before anyone risked a sequel, “Center Stage: Turn It Up,” and that one went direct to DVD.) Stephen Daldry’s “Billy Elliot” (2000) shouldn’t count because it painted a truer picture of Mrs. Thatcher’s England than it did of a dance class. Not surprisingly, Film Forum found itself besieged by capacity crowds for both ‘Shoes,’ which ended its scheduled two-week run on November 19, and “La Danse,” which is in its sixth week as this report is filed, and has since opened in Los Angeles and Chicago.

Our ballet-challenged film reviewers spent much of their space hailing Wiseman for his 40-year career as an objective observer who never editorializes and scrupulously exercises his considerable power as film editor. He was duly hailed for these qualities in “La Danse,” his 35th documentary (there have been two fiction films), but no movie reviewer I read prepared balletgoers for what Wiseman captures as his camera roams the corridors, stairwells, studios and stages of the Palais Garnier for 12 weeks (in the fall of 2007). Some of the world’s most gifted and beautiful dancers are shown stuck in a predominantly Eurochic repertory that debases their artistry as heedlessly as it wastes their energy, yet the ever-objective Wiseman doesn’t seem either bothered by or aware of it.

For a New Yorker, a year of POB’s assiduously advanced, flavor-of-the-month fare would be as enervating as attending a City Ballet season devoted almost entirely to Diamond Project commissions.

To get the rest of the article, including a new introduction by Paul Ben-Itzak, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10; contact Paul. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .