Back to the Future: How to access stories on the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager

Returning to its roots as a Direct E-mail List — as the most effective, efficient way to serve our subscribers, writers, advertisers, and readers — the DI will heretofore make all new content, as well as reprints from our 20-year archive of more than 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 writers of performances on five continents, plus news, commentary, art, and the Jill Johnston Archive, available strictly by e-mail. To subscribe to the DI and access both this new content and archived stories, for just $29.95/year individuals or $49.95 institutions, just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to find out about payment by check or in Euros. (In the latter case, the payments will be directed to our European correspondents.) You can also contact us at that address to find out about limited, well-integrated e-mail advertising options.

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20 years of giving a voice to dancers: The Queen of Concept — Scheme Sabotages Style in Sarah Michelson’s “Daylight”

By Philip W. Sandstrom
Copyright 2005, 2018 Philip W. Sandstrom

Founded in 1998 by a collective of professional dance artists and journalists to build the dance audience, tell stories not told elsewhere, and give a voice to dancers, the DI is celebrating its 20th anniversary this week by offering one-year subscriptions for just $20, including full access to our archive of 2,000 reviews of performances and art from around the world by 150 leading dance critics. Subscribe through PayPal by designating your payment to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. The longtime technical director of Dance Theater Workshop, acclaimed lighting designer Philip W. Sandstrom is a DI senior critic.

NEW YORK — For her new “Daylight,” Sarah Michelson radically reconfigured PS 122’s second-floor theater, effectively dropping a new performance space into the midst of the old one. If you’ve performed in or observed performances at this space, you know the stage is bisected by two permanent columns; Michelson plopped the seating — three custom-seating risers — adjacent to and in between these fixtures. Then she painted everything — including the walls — white. The only exception to this snowy landscape was Claude Wampler’s four large portraits of the dancers, delineated, etch-a-sketch style, in a continuous thin black line on an all-white canvas. A phalanx of upright chrome theatrical lights, mounted on poles like speared heads, confronted the audience at the lip of the stage. A gentle haze thinly filled the air and the theater was bathed in natural blue-sky light pouring through a large exposed window on the south side of the auditorium.

To receive the complete article, first published on June 28, 2005, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? This week you can subscribe to the DI for one year at the discounted rate of $20. Just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI/AV Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading critics of performances and art on five continents from 1998 through 2015.

Fearless: Celebrating Homer Avila

Homer Robin

Homer Avila by Robin Hoffman.

By Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2004, 2018 Paul Ben-Itzak

Founded in 1998 by a collective of professional dance artists and journalists to build the dance audience, tell stories not told elsewhere, and give a voice to dancers, the DI is celebrating its 20th anniversary. For information on purchasing your own copy of our archive of 2,000 reviews of performances, news, and art from around the world by 150 leading dance critics, e-mail paulbenitzak@gmail.com . To celebrate its 20th anniversary, this week the DI is offering one-year subscriptions for just $20. See below for more information.

Homer Avila died Sunday night, at the age of 49, at Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York, where he’d checked himself in Saturday. “He was dancing until Friday, checked himself into the hospital Saturday night, and was gone by twilight Sunday,” reports Pentacle’s Ivan Sygoda. “The cancer that cost him his hip and leg had metastasized and reached his lungs.”

The journalist trades in the effects of sympathy. By his reporting and then the selection and arranging of details, he can write an obituary to pull your heart out. I’ve been doing this for more than 25 years, since a high school English teacher I didn’t know that well passed away unexpectedly, and I set about interviewing his colleagues. Did I know what they told me was moving? Yes. Was I moved by their words? Yes, but it was probably a detached empathy. This one is hard.

Homer danced with Momix and with Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane, where he would meet his partner Edisa Weeks. I first caught them in an evening of performance in a church basement on the Upper East Side, where their duet “Dubious Faith” was the highlight. Homer played a priest, with the taller Edisa lifting and twirling him; Homer walked on upended wine glasses. More miracles were to come.

To receive the complete article, first published on April 27, 2004 and featuring excerpts from DI reviews of Homer’s performances around the world and comments from Homer and colleagues, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? This week you can subscribe to the DI for one year at the discounted rate of $20, 33 percent off the regular rate.  Just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI/AV Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading critics of performances and art on five continents from 1998 through 2015.

20 years of giving a voice to dancers: Originals of the Species — Fresh Tracks from Laverdure, Kikuchi & Sugimoto, Ballos, Linehan, Bokaer and Allen

By Gus Solomons jr
Copyright 2004, 2018 Gus Solomons jr

Founded in 1998 by a collective of professional dance artists and journalists to build the dance audience, tell stories not told elsewhere, and give a voice to dancers, the DI is celebrating its 20th anniversary. For information on purchasing your own copy of our archive of 2,000 reviews of performances and art from around the world by 150 leading dance critics, e-mail paulbenitzak@gmail.com . To celebrate its 20th anniversary, this week the DI is offering one-year subscriptions for just $20. See below for more information.

NEW YORK — The latest edition of Dance Theater Workshop’s Fresh Tracks, performed November 26-27, reconfirms that it is New York’s premiere series for presenting challenging, emerging choreographer/performers. Two duets (by Jeremy Laverdure and Yuka Kikuchi and Yoko Sugimoto) and four solos (by Felicia Ballos, Daniel Linehan, Jonah Bokaer, and Melinda Allen) showcased sure-footed, expressive dances that ranged from humor to dramatic abstraction to indeterminacy to politics and restored our often tenuous faith that original young dance voices still exist.

To receive the complete article, first published on December 2, 2004, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? This week you can subscribe to the DI for one year at the discounted rate of $20, 33 percent off the regular rate. (Or $49 in lieu of $99 for institutions, with full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etcetera.) Just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI/AV Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading critics of performances and art on five continents from 1998 through 2015.

40+, the Dancer’s Plus

freespace donna soloMiracle-workers: The last time I saw Kent Lindemer, he was falling from the sky into the arms of three fellows two of whom he’d never worked with before. The piece was “Particle Zoo,” and the place was the Joyce Theater, which was good for the company, Pilobolus, because the scheduled fourth performer was sick, and Lindemer, a fungus alumnus, happened to live in the Chelsea neighborhood. (As I recall, the replacement was so last minute that Lindemer had no time to rehearse with his new catchers.) Apparently Lindemer was not bobbled and did not discombobulate into a million tiny particles, because I see here in the 20-year’s old and still going strong DI in-box that Lindemer is scheduled to be re-assembled Saturday at 8 p.m. by Yoga Mechanics — er, sorry, that should be *at* Yoga Mechanics — in lovely Montclair, NJ (I do like Jersey best) among a scintillating universe of dance veterans, including Nikolais and Murray Louis dance giant Alberto (you never write, you never call; please send company/foundation news) Del Saz and, above, the same troupe’s luminous alumna and my leading dance miracle-worker Donna Scro Samori, when her company hosts Freespace Dance 40+. Also featuring Stephanie Beauchamp, Janette Dishuk, Loretta Fois, Rick Kitts, Andrea Kron, Lynn Needle, Stephanie Nerbak, Wendy Reo, Joelle van Sickle and Leslie Smollen Wuebben. Ticket info here. Tony Turner photo courtesy Freespace Dance. — Paul Ben-Itzak, Dance Insider co-founder

Your company, show, audition, school, university, summer program, art expo, job opening, or product ad here

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Celebrating 20 years as the Internet’s longest-running arts magazine, the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager is now offering Home page ads with photos starting at just $49/month when you sign up by April 2. Contact paulbenitzak@gmail.com for more information to join Freespace Dance (top), Slippery Rock University Dance (above), and others in sponsoring the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager, for two decades the leading voice for artists.

Women aren’t just victims, V: From the Gooey to the Sublime — Mantero Reaches Olympian Heights in Improv Program

By Josephine Leask
Copyright 2001, 2018 Josephine Leask

NEW YORK — A solo, duet and group piece made up the varied Movement Research Improvisation Festival program Friday at University Settlement, packed by an enthusiastic crowd composed mostly of dancers. (Those who appreciate improvised performance the most tend to be dancers who have improvised themselves.) The highlight was the Portuguese artist Vera Mantero. A quirky performer, Mantero presented a theatrical improvisation based on Edouard Manet’s famous 1863 nude painting “Olympia.” Rather than drawing on movement itself, Mantero’s improvisation took on a more tangible focus, that of text and ‘the work of art.’ Wobbling across the stage perched on a pair of stilettos with a luscious red rose in her auburn hair and wearing nothing else, Mantero reads extracts from Jean Dubuffet’s manifesto on art while ‘becoming’ Olympia herself. Dragging a couch behind her into the performance space, with eyes glued to her book in studious concentration, she recites haltingly, as if discovering the text. Already the juxtaposition of a naked woman reading male text challenges the supremacy of the male artist over his passive female object.

To receive the complete article, first published on December 11, 2001, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI/AV Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading critics of performances and art on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $109 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com.