Back to the Future: How to access stories on the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager

Returning to its roots as a Direct E-mail List — as the most effective, efficient way to serve our subscribers, writers, advertisers, and readers — the DI will heretofore make all new content, as well as reprints from our 20-year archive of more than 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 writers of performances on five continents, plus news, commentary, art, and the Jill Johnston Archive, available strictly by e-mail. To subscribe to the DI and access both this new content and archived stories, for just $29.95/year individuals or $49.95 institutions, just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to find out about payment by check or in Euros. (In the latter case, the payments will be directed to our European correspondents.) You can also contact us at that address to find out about limited, well-integrated e-mail advertising options.

Women on the Verge: Vicky Shick, Screened and Unscreened

By Nancy Dalva
Copyright 2003, 2017 Nancy Dalva

NEW YORK — Vicky Shick is such a modest and reticent performer and choreographer that she does everything in her power, which is considerable, to disappear herself from the very stage on which she sets her work. Her new dance “Undoing,” first performed on March 4 and 5 at Dance Theatre Workshop (to be repeated on March 13, 14, 22 and 23), makes you feel as if you are spying on her, and on her four lovely female dancers (Juliette Mapp, Jodi Melnick, Eileen Thomas, and Meg Wolfe) glimpsing this and that through lamp-lit windows. This voyeuristic sensation recalls Trisha Brown, who made a solo called “If You Couldn’t See Me” some time after the six excellent years Schick spent in her company. (Incidentally but interestingly, another former Brown dancer, Stephen Petronio, otherwise a very different kind of choreographer and a totally different kind of dancer from Schick, evoked that same voyeuristic mood in his recent “City of Twist.” ) “Undoing” is elliptical, calligraphic, elegant, and unreadable, yet narrative. Imagine opening a book to find almost all the words erased — here and there an adverb, a noun, an indefinite article — and the pages out of order. That would be “Undoing.”

To receive the complete article, first published on March 12, 2003, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI/AV Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading critics of performances and art on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $109 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com.

Schussing the Korper with Sasha Waltz

By Nancy Dalva
Copyright 2002, 2017 Nancy Dalva

NEW YORK — Sasha Waltz’s “Korper” — which traveled from its home theater, Berlin’s Schaubuhne am Lehniner Platz, to the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s 20th Next Wave Festival last week — really does feel like something new, or rather, something neo. This is what German expressionism looks like in the 21st century: a fusion form, as much deconstructed as constructed, but reliant on the German past for its root images and its ur-meanings, as I intuit them. “Korper” — which means body, and which is about the body — is a 90-minute ensemble piece with an international cast of 13. It unfolds with an eerie lack of tone. The funny, the tragic, the weird, the obscure, the preposterous — they’re all given the same weight, which gives the piece the look of surrealism and the feeling of a dream.

To receive the complete article, first published on November 19, 2002, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $109 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com.