Haring & East Village @ MoMA

moma haring smallFrom the exhibition Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983, on view at the Museum of Modern Art from October 31 through April 1, 2018: Keith Haring, Acts of Live Art at Club 57, 1980. Photograph by and copyright Joseph Szkodzinski. Courtesy the artist.

Advertisements

Making decoys with Trisha Brown and Robert Rauschenberg at MoMA in NY

trisha moma smallFrom the exhibition Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, running through September 17 at the Museum of Modern Art: Trisha Brown, “Glacial Decoy,” 1979. With costumes, set, and lighting (with Beverly Emmons), by Robert Rauschenberg. From  performances by the Trisha Brown Dance Company at the Marymount Manhattan College Theater, New York, June 20–24, 1979. Left to right: Trisha Brown, Nina Lundborg, and Dance Insider contributor Lisa Kraus. (See below for Kraus on setting Brown’s “Glacial Decoy” on the Paris Opera Ballet.)  Photograph: Babette Mangolte © 1979 Babette Mangolte. (All Rights of Reproduction Reserved) Courtesy Museum of Modern Art.

Musical comedy focus: ‘It’s Great to Be Alive’ in a manless world, baby, at MoMA

moma alive smallNewly preserved by the Museum of Modern Art from a unique nitrate print in the museum’s collection, Alfred Werker’s rollicking pre-Code musical comedy “It’s Great to Be Alive” (1933), above, produced by the Fox Film Corporation, is set in a near future where every man on Earth has succumbed to the fatal disease of “masculitis.” As Edna Mae Oliver leads a team of female scientists in a desperate attempt to create an artificial man, one lone male — an aviator, played by the Brazilian star Raúl Roulien — is discovered living on a tropical island. Returned to civilization, he becomes an object of hot contention, claimed by his fiancée (Gloria Stuart — who’d portray the aged Rose in James Cameron’s “Titanic” 64 years later) but kidnapped by a gangster (Dorothy Burgess) who plans to auction him off to the highest bidder. Final showing tonight at 7 p.m. at MoMa in New York City. Image courtesy MoMA.

Art from the Archives: Ay-O

japan momaFrom the DI Archives: Featuring over 200 works of various media — painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, drawings, and graphic design, as well as video and documentary film — Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde, an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, was first highlighted on the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager in February 2013 with, above: Ay-O, “Pastoral (Den’en),” 1956. Oil on panel, 72 1/16″ x 12′ 1 13/16″ (183 x 370.4 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo. © Ay-O & courtesy Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo.

If you will it, it is no dream

rousseauthedream smallAmong the work from the permanent collection currently on view in the Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries of the Museum of Modern Art: Henri Rousseau, “The Dream,”  1910. Oil on canvas, 6′ 8 1/2″ x 9′ 9 1/2″ (204.5 x 298.5 cm). The  Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller. Love art? Check our sister site The Arts Voyager.

“Stormy Weather” with La Dunham & friends at the Museum of Modern Art

dunham moma smallAmong the under-projected classics screening April 18 – 26 at the Museum of Modern Art for Making Faces on Film: A Collaboration with BFI Black Star is the 1943 all-star extravaganza “Stormy Weather,” featuring Lena Horne and Bill ‘Bojangles’ Robinson (above), Cab Calloway, Fats Waller, Dooley Wilson, the tap-flying Nicholas Brothers, Katherine Dunham and her Troupe, and just about every other major African-American performer of the epoch. Directed by Andrew L. Stone, the movie was meant to help the recruiting effort among African-Americans. The MoMA mini-festival celebrates the legacy of African-American artists working both within and outside the mainstream film industry. Image: Film Study Center Special Collections, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

543.2005.2Louise Bourgeois, “Spiral Woman,” 2003. Dry point and engraving. Sheet: 17 x 15″ (43.2 x 38.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist. © 2017 The Easton Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, NY. From the upcoming exhibition Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait, on view at the Museum of Modern Art September 24, 2017 through January 2018.