Move, Members, Move

moma moving stories smallIf there’s one person in dance who is consistent, it’s Battery Dance’s Jonathan Hollander, whose vision, contrary to the myopia which sometimes infects other leaders of the New York dance community, has always been both global and community-oriented in the larger sense. Receiving its premiere Sunday at 7 p.m. at the Museum of Modern Art as part of MoMA’s Doc Fortnight festival, Rob Fruchtman’s 2017 “Moving Stories” follows six dancers from Battery, including ex-Graham fixture Tadej Brdnik, as they travel to India, Romania, Korea, and Iraq to work with at-risk youth, with just one week to prepare a performance. The documentary is preceded by Maris Curran’s “While I Yet Live,” in which five acclaimed African-American quilters from Gee’s Bend, Alabama, discuss love, religion, and the fight for civil rights as they continue the tradition of quilting that brought them together, and followed by a discussion with some of the dancers, who also included Robin Cantrell, Mira Cook, Clement Mensah, Sean Scantlebury and Lydia Tetzlaff. Photo courtesy Rob Fruchtman.

Advertisements

Tarsila do Amaral at MoMA

moma brazilian one small.jpgBorn in São Paulo in 1886, Tarsila do Amaral (d. 1973) traveled to Paris in 1920 to study at the celebrated Académie Julian, subsequently working with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger to fulfill what she referred to as her “military service in Cubism.” From February 11 through June 3 the Museum of Modern Art exhibits nearly 120 paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and documents relating to the artist culled from across America and Europe, including, above: “Carnival in Madureira (Carnaval em Madureira),” oil on canvas, 29 15/16 x 25 inches (76 x 63.5 cm). Acervo da Fundação José e Paulina Nemirovsky, em comodato com a Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos and courtesy MoMA.

Trisha & Steve, together again @ MoMA

moma judson 2018 smallRunning September 16 through February 3, 2019 at the Museum of Modern Art, Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done posits the ongoing importance of the legacy of Judson Dance Theater, beginning with the workshops led by Anna Halprin, Robert Ellis Dunn, and James Waring and extending to the influence of other downtown figures including Simone Forti and Andy Warhol, as well as the Judson Gallery and the Living Theater. Through performances and some 300 objects including film, photography, sculpture, music, poetry, and architectural drawings, the exhibition celebrates Judson’s multidisciplinary and collaborative ethos as well as the range of its integers, including, above, the late Trisha Brown and Steve Paxton as captured by Peter Moore performing Brown’s “Trillium, Concert of Dance #4” on January 30, 1963. Photo ©Barbara Moore / licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Courtesy Paula Cooper, New York.

The dim sum of it with Stephen Shore

moma steven shore chinatownAs part of the most comprehensive exhibition ever organized for photographer Stephen Shore, opening November 19 at the Museum of Modern Art, where it runs through May 28, MoMA is featuring, above: Stephen Shore, “1:35 a.m., in Chinatown Restaurant, New York, New York,” 1965-67. Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1995. Nine × 13 1/2 inches (22.9 × 34.3 cm). Courtesy the artist. © 2017 Stephen Shore and courtesy MoMA.

Haring & East Village @ MoMA

moma haring smallFrom the exhibition Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983, on view at the Museum of Modern Art from October 31 through April 1, 2018: Keith Haring, Acts of Live Art at Club 57, 1980. Photograph by and copyright Joseph Szkodzinski. Courtesy the artist.

Making decoys with Trisha Brown and Robert Rauschenberg at MoMA in NY

trisha moma smallFrom the exhibition Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, running through September 17 at the Museum of Modern Art: Trisha Brown, “Glacial Decoy,” 1979. With costumes, set, and lighting (with Beverly Emmons), by Robert Rauschenberg. From  performances by the Trisha Brown Dance Company at the Marymount Manhattan College Theater, New York, June 20–24, 1979. Left to right: Trisha Brown, Nina Lundborg, and Dance Insider contributor Lisa Kraus. (See below for Kraus on setting Brown’s “Glacial Decoy” on the Paris Opera Ballet.)  Photograph: Babette Mangolte © 1979 Babette Mangolte. (All Rights of Reproduction Reserved) Courtesy Museum of Modern Art.

Musical comedy focus: ‘It’s Great to Be Alive’ in a manless world, baby, at MoMA

moma alive smallNewly preserved by the Museum of Modern Art from a unique nitrate print in the museum’s collection, Alfred Werker’s rollicking pre-Code musical comedy “It’s Great to Be Alive” (1933), above, produced by the Fox Film Corporation, is set in a near future where every man on Earth has succumbed to the fatal disease of “masculitis.” As Edna Mae Oliver leads a team of female scientists in a desperate attempt to create an artificial man, one lone male — an aviator, played by the Brazilian star Raúl Roulien — is discovered living on a tropical island. Returned to civilization, he becomes an object of hot contention, claimed by his fiancée (Gloria Stuart — who’d portray the aged Rose in James Cameron’s “Titanic” 64 years later) but kidnapped by a gangster (Dorothy Burgess) who plans to auction him off to the highest bidder. Final showing tonight at 7 p.m. at MoMa in New York City. Image courtesy MoMA.