Back to the Future: How to access stories on the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager

Returning to its roots as a Direct E-mail List — as the most effective, efficient way to serve our subscribers, writers, advertisers, and readers — the DI will heretofore make all new content, as well as reprints from our 20-year archive of more than 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 writers of performances on five continents, plus news, commentary, art, and the Jill Johnston Archive, available strictly by e-mail. To subscribe to the DI and access both this new content and archived stories, for just $29.95/year individuals or $49.95 institutions, just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to find out about payment by check or in Euros. (In the latter case, the payments will be directed to our European correspondents.) You can also contact us at that address to find out about limited, well-integrated e-mail advertising options.

20 years of giving a voice to dancers: Originals of the Species — Fresh Tracks from Laverdure, Kikuchi & Sugimoto, Ballos, Linehan, Bokaer and Allen

By Gus Solomons jr
Copyright 2004, 2018 Gus Solomons jr

Founded in 1998 by a collective of professional dance artists and journalists to build the dance audience, tell stories not told elsewhere, and give a voice to dancers, the DI is celebrating its 20th anniversary. For information on purchasing your own copy of our archive of 2,000 reviews of performances and art from around the world by 150 leading dance critics, e-mail paulbenitzak@gmail.com . To celebrate its 20th anniversary, this week the DI is offering one-year subscriptions for just $20. See below for more information.

NEW YORK — The latest edition of Dance Theater Workshop’s Fresh Tracks, performed November 26-27, reconfirms that it is New York’s premiere series for presenting challenging, emerging choreographer/performers. Two duets (by Jeremy Laverdure and Yuka Kikuchi and Yoko Sugimoto) and four solos (by Felicia Ballos, Daniel Linehan, Jonah Bokaer, and Melinda Allen) showcased sure-footed, expressive dances that ranged from humor to dramatic abstraction to indeterminacy to politics and restored our often tenuous faith that original young dance voices still exist.

To receive the complete article, first published on December 2, 2004, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? This week you can subscribe to the DI for one year at the discounted rate of $20, 33 percent off the regular rate. (Or $49 in lieu of $99 for institutions, with full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etcetera.) Just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI/AV Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading critics of performances and art on five continents from 1998 through 2015.

Impressing the Czar: Speed-Dialing Dance History with William Forsythe and the Royal Ballet of Flanders

By Gus Solomons jr
Copyright 2008, 2017 Gus Solomons jr

NEW YORK — The Royal Ballet of Flanders really gets William Forsythe’s work. In its July 18 performance of his 1988 epic, “Impressing the Czar,” as part of the Lincoln Center Festival, the feeling of outrageous fun was pervasive. In her first act as artistic director of the Flanders company, Kathryn Bennetts — the former ballet mistress of Forsythe’s Ballet Frankfurt — asked for the rights to the ballet, which Forsythe had until then declined to grant. He entrusted her with exclusive permission to perform the work.

To receive the complete article, first published on August 29, 2008, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $109 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com.

The DI Year 2: Rolphing Boredom — Dean Moss’s Strange Kinetic Poem at Judson

By Gus Solomons jr
Copyright 2002, 2017 Gus Solomons jr

NEW YORK — In “The Board Dance,” an excerpt from his 2001 “american deluxe,” Dean Moss stands between a video projector and the altar wall of St. Mark’s Church, where Japanese martial arts films, old Westerns, and he himself rehearsing this same dance are projected. Moss manipulates a five-by-three foot board that’s Mylar-mirrored on one side and reflective white on the other. The prop manipulation recalls the work of his mentor David Gordon, in whose Pick Up Company Moss performed for ten years. The projections change scale and reflections flash on the side walls, as he swirls the board, balances it on a corner, lies on top of it, under it, hikes it overhead and lets the top edge flip down to the floor. Moss’s deft execution of the task is intriguing, enhanced by the changing film backdrop against which it is performed. It’s a clever, straightforward, minimalist essay, clearly designed and crisply done.

To receive the complete article, first published on November 5, 2002, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to find out how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@@gmail.com .

Following Trump statements on Charlottesville terrorist attack, de Lavallade declines White House invitation (Corrected)

By Dance Insider Staff
Copyright 2017 The Dance Insider

NEW YORK — Following President Donald Trump’s equating Nazi sympathizers and white supremacists with those who protested their armed presence Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia — where 20-year-old James Alex Fields, Jr. has been charged with second-degree murder after allegedly ramming his car into a crowd protesting the White supremacists, killing 32-year-old paralegal and activist Heather Heyer and wounding 19 others — dance legend Carmen de Lavallade said Thursday she will not be attending the White House reception following her receiving the Kennedy Center Honors Award next December.

“I am truly honored to receive the Kennedy Center Honors Award and look forward to attending the ceremony at the Kennedy Center,” de Lavallade announced. “In light of the socially divisive and morally caustic narrative that our existing leadership is choosing to engage in, and in keeping with the principles that I and so many others have fought for, I will be declining the invitation to attend the reception at the White House.”

On Tuesday, the president told reporters outside Trump Tower, revising an earlier  statement about Saturday’s attack in which he condemned  White supremacists including the Ku Klux Klan, “I think there is blame on both sides” who took part in the demonstrations. “You had a group on one side that was bad. You had a group on the other side that was also very violent. Nobody wants to say that. I’ll say it right now.” Yesterday, referring to the city of Charlottesville’s decision to remove a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee which was the pretext for the extremists’ descending on the Virginia city, Trump added, “Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart with the removal of our beautiful statues and monuments.”

In addition to Ms. Heyer, two state troopers were also killed when their helicopter crashed while they were en route to the demonstration.