The Big Bang Axiom: Back to the Future with “Inventing Abstraction” at MoMA

abstraction severini for repost

From the Arts Voyager archives: Gino Severini, “Mare = Ballerina (Sea = dancer),” 1913. Tempera and pastel on cardboard, 25 13/16 x 18 ½” (65.5 x 47 cm). Triton Foundation. ©2012 Gino Severini / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Photo courtesy of the Triton Foundation.

By Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2013, 2018 Paul Ben-Itzak

If you think the world only started getting smaller — and the many worlds of art cross-fertilizing — with the advent of the Internet, you need to get yourself to the Museum of Modern Art in New York. With “Inventing Abstraction: 1910-1925,” a pan-media exhibition of 350 paintings, drawings, prints, books, sculptures, photographs, recordings, dances, and more, running through April 15, MoMA returns to its historical and pedagogical roots and, not incidentally, furnishes a much-needed refresher for a 21st century New York art world as evidently rootless as it is profligate, as well as a template for today’s would be multi-media hopscotchers, too often content with dilettante dabbling and dipping into their sister art forms.

(To receive the complete article, first published exclusively on the DI and AV on January 8, 2013, including more images, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for one year for just $36/year by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check.)