See Freespace Dance Soar

freespace small(Dance Insider Principal Sponsor Ad) The Star-Ledger’s Robert Johnson calls Donna Scro Samori  / Freepace Dance “astonishing and wonderfully gratifying.”  For information on classes and upcoming performances, including the company’s December 2 appearance at the Montclair Arts Festival, click here. Above: Freespace Dance artistic director Donna Scro Samori and Omni Kitts, as captured by Lois Greenfield. Photo copyright Lois Greenfield. (To advertise your dance program, performance, audition, or product on the Dance Insider, please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com . Sponsor ads just $49 when you sign up by November 30, 2017.)

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Hear them breathe: Brookoff up close

matt image smallCrashing through the membrane: I still remember the first intimate ballet showing I was privileged to see, in Joffrey Ballet co-founder Gerald Arpino’s no-frills basement studio near the Church Street Safeway in San Francisco. The intake and exhalation of breath, the contours of the leg muscles and the grasping of hands right in front of you; there’s nothing like it for appreciating the hard work and honesty that goes into dances rigorously created and earnestly performed. Even moreso when the choreography is built around connections: of partners, of circles (evoking the primordial dances around a fire so eloquently described by Curt Sachs) — of the delicate digits of the pianist to the expressive hands and torsos of the dancers and the musicality of the dancemaker. New Yorkers will be gifted (much as I protest the recent lazy perversion of our language which turns nouns into graceless verbs, trampling the correct and more elegant versions in the process — right? — this term seems to ring just here) with such an opportunity Saturday in Brooklyn, when Mathew Brookoff and his Brookoff Dance Repertory Company occupy the Duffy Studio of Brooklyn’s Mark Morris Dance Center from 5 to 6 p.m., variously occupying Schoenberg’s Six Little Piano Pieces and a Schubert Impromptu in the veteran choreo’s anything but impromptu duet entwinings. (I plead for an exception for that one from Messieurs Strunk & White.) In addition to these new sculptures in motion, Brookoff also expands his recent group work “Fracture” (above) from six to 12 dancers. Free and open to the public. Pictured at the rear, from left to right: Andrew Harper, Tiffany Mangulabnan, and Jordan Miller; in front: Ali Block, Amy Saunder, and Brian Gephart. — PB-I (inspired by Harris Green)

Hot off the boards….

josephine barbican 3Aki Tsujita in Darren Johnston’s “Zero Point.” Foteini Christofilopoulou photograph courtesy the Barbican.

LONDON — The muffled, thudding beat of Tim Hecker’s ambient sound score reverberates through our bodies — it’s like the noise you might hear waiting outside a cool nightclub. The dazzling bank of lights rotates towards the audience, blinding us before diminishing and plunging both stage and auditorium into darkness. Smoke fills the stage and laser lights shine down on it from above to create giant cones of mist. This is the hypnotically dramatic opening to Darren Johnston’s “Zero Point,” seen at the Barbican on May 26. A male dancer emerges from the claustrophobic gloom upstage and walks meditatively into one of the cones, fluidly progressing through a series of sculptural poses, working within the confines of the translucent edges. He leaves as two women emerge and take up position in the other two cones. In slow motion they sink to the ground then rise up again, turning, then repeat these motions, their mouths gaping open like gargoyles from an ancient civilization. Their physical language mixes Butoh, contemporary and Eastern ritualistic dance. It’s strong and grounded.

British choreographer and visual artist Johnston works with perception-altering visual and aural effects in “Zero Point,” which takes its name from Quantum Physics’s notion of ‘trapped’ space. Video projections, motion sensing digital technology, and trancey music transform the stage into another galaxy while lighting effects unzip the darkened stage into geometric sections for the dancers to perform in. Even time seems to be momentarily suspended.

“Zero Point” is a work that has been inspired by Johnston’s residency at the Museum of Art in Kochi, Japan. His cast of nine Japanese dancers who collectively draw from a range of disciplines including ballet, contemporary, Butoh, and Qigong are alumni of Tokyo’s New National Ballet, Sankai Juku, Netherlands Dance Theatre, and the Forsythe Company. The mixture of styles is performed with a contemplative quality and presence that is inspired by Buddhism and sacred Japanese ceremonial spaces. Movement flows in repeated cycles, with frozen poses pausing the tempo and the performers embodying a theatrical neutrality and modesty. Energy is contained and protracted through their bodies. There’s a welcome stillness and an aura of calm about them but also a lack of humanity. Sitting in the auditorium, I feel distanced from the performers and yearn for a fuller immersive experience.

Loose narratives of re-birth are played out through duets between Yatsutake Shimaji and ballerina Hana Sakai. He carries her onstage then makes her come to life, his hands hovering over her body, commanding her actions as if she’s his puppet. She ascends from the floor and extends to her full height on pointe, before gliding towards him as if under his spell. In their partnering Sakai and Shimaji create imaginative tableaux, but the use of balletic lines, while visually striking in the fractured light, lacks the earthy connection that is seen in the shapes of the contemporary and Butoh dancers. The demanding, ambitious Western associations of ballet jar awkwardly with the selfless Eastern spiritualism of the work as a whole. This balletic duet is also annoyingly patriarchal and while the other women move as equals to the men, with their freer expressions, Sakai does not, restrained by both her partner and her discipline.

While “Zero Point” is a reflective and inventive work which can easily seduce, choreographic ideas feel somewhat undercooked.

Flash Review, 11-22: A Star is Born — Akram Khan… and company

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Akram Khan and musicians (including the triple-threat Yoshie Sunahata – see story — on taiko) performing Khan’s “Gnosis.” Photo courtesy Theatre de la Ville. Photo © & courtesy Laurent Ziegler.

By Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2010, 2016 Paul Ben-Itzak

Originally published on May 11, 2010; appropriately enough, Martha Graham’s birthday. The Theatre de la Ville presents the Akram Khan company in  Khan’s “Until the Lions” December 5-17 at La Villette and in his “Chotto Desh” December 21-January 6 at the les Abbesses in Montmartre.

“You can’t always get what you want But if you try sometimes, you might get what you need.”
— The Rolling Stones

PARIS — About a year ago, Akram Khan, the London-based choreographer with a penchant for mixing up Kathak and modern dance — actually more of an enterprise, with three companies touring his work — traveled to Sado Island in the north of Japan in search of a male taiko drummer to collaborate with for his latest piece, “Gnosis,” which opened last night at the Theatre de la Ville – Abbesses in Montmartre as part of a world tour (excluding the U.S., but we’ll get to that). “I wanted a man,” he recounted to last night’s audience towards the end of part one, featuring Khan engaged in interplay with a musical ensemble including two male singers (Faheem Mazhar and Sanju Sathai), and players on the tabla (also Sathai), the string instrument the sarod (Soumik Datta), the Taiko drums (we’ll get to her), and cello (Lucy Railton). “They kept telling me, ‘No, you want this girl.'” They are Kodo, the renowned Japanese drumming group. The girl was Yoshie Sunahata, a.k.a. the latest performing arts triple threat and the most thrilling discovery I’ve made 10 years covering dance in France.

To get the rest of the article, including more images, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $4 or three for $10; contact Paul. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .

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For her new “I Know You,” Donna Scro Samori, artistic director of Freespace Dance, has brought together 23 dancers ranging in age from 15 to 65. Premiering October 22 at 8 p.m. and October 23 at 4 p.m. at the Space at Yoga Mechanics in Montclair, New Jersey, “I Know You” explores the shared worlds, experiences, thoughts, and emotions that connect people from different walks of life, says Samori, a veteran of the Nikolais/Louis, Sean Curran, Peter Pucci, and other dance companies who often integrates Anusara yoga, of which she’s a certified teacher, into her choreographies. Photo from Donna Scro Samori’s “I Know You” by and copyright Robert Cooper.