Hear them breathe: Brookoff up close

matt image smallCrashing through the membrane: I still remember the first intimate ballet showing I was privileged to see, in Joffrey Ballet co-founder Gerald Arpino’s no-frills basement studio near the Church Street Safeway in San Francisco. The intake and exhalation of breath, the contours of the leg muscles and the grasping of hands right in front of you; there’s nothing like it for appreciating the hard work and honesty that goes into dances rigorously created and earnestly performed. Even moreso when the choreography is built around connections: of partners, of circles (evoking the primordial dances around a fire so eloquently described by Curt Sachs) — of the delicate digits of the pianist to the expressive hands and torsos of the dancers and the musicality of the dancemaker. New Yorkers will be gifted (much as I protest the recent lazy perversion of our language which turns nouns into graceless verbs, trampling the correct and more elegant versions in the process — right? — this term seems to ring just here) with such an opportunity Saturday in Brooklyn, when Mathew Brookoff and his Brookoff Dance Repertory Company occupy the Duffy Studio of Brooklyn’s Mark Morris Dance Center from 5 to 6 p.m., variously occupying Schoenberg’s Six Little Piano Pieces and a Schubert Impromptu in the veteran choreo’s anything but impromptu duet entwinings. (I plead for an exception for that one from Messieurs Strunk & White.) In addition to these new sculptures in motion, Brookoff also expands his recent group work “Fracture” (above) from six to 12 dancers. Free and open to the public. Pictured at the rear, from left to right: Andrew Harper, Tiffany Mangulabnan, and Jordan Miller; in front: Ali Block, Amy Saunder, and Brian Gephart. — PB-I (inspired by Harris Green)

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Dance Insider Principal Sponsorship Available: The Dance Insider Principal Sponsor will join Principal Sponsors Freespace Dance (above) and Slippery Rock Dance in sharing for one year the very top spot on this Dance Insider Home page — the longest-running Home page in Dance Journalism. You get that top spot for four months (where the Nutmeg Ballet image is now on top of our Home page); when you’re not in that spot, you get a recurrent ad on the Home page. For details, please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com .

Impressing the Czar: Speed-Dialing Dance History with William Forsythe and the Royal Ballet of Flanders

By Gus Solomons jr
Copyright 2008, 2017 Gus Solomons jr

NEW YORK — The Royal Ballet of Flanders really gets William Forsythe’s work. In its July 18 performance of his 1988 epic, “Impressing the Czar,” as part of the Lincoln Center Festival, the feeling of outrageous fun was pervasive. In her first act as artistic director of the Flanders company, Kathryn Bennetts — the former ballet mistress of Forsythe’s Ballet Frankfurt — asked for the rights to the ballet, which Forsythe had until then declined to grant. He entrusted her with exclusive permission to perform the work.

To receive the complete article, first published on August 29, 2008, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $109 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com.

Aerial dance yourself

julie class smallSomatic Aerial Dance Classes: Julie Ludwick of Fly-by-Night Dance Theater offers a mindful approach to Aerial Dance, blending Improvisation and Skinner Releasing Technique. Emphasis is on alignment to prevent injury and on enhancing creativity. No aerial experience is necessary. Classes are held in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and have been featured in Paper Magazine and Time Out NY. Julie Ludwick was the subject of a special documentary from AfterEd TV, as an outstanding alumna of Teachers College at Columbia University. Click here for class schedule and more information; and here to see a class video. (Got a class or school to advertise? Contact paulbenitzak@gmail.com.)

Action Heroines from Monica Bill Barnes

By Chris Dohse
Copyright 2002, 2017 Chris Dohse

NEW YORK — Imagine an all-female, multigenerational, Elvis-crazed dance arena wherein hearts are broken but dreams come true and abiding love conquers all. Monica Bill Barnes’s “When We Were Pretty” (seen June 30 at Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church) is such a place. The very last performance of Danspace’s exemplary season, ‘Pretty’ uses the spaces of the church in ways not quite seen before and is filled with muscular, funny, and poignant dance episodes. Barnes’s work is neither as angry as that of Ellis Wood, with whom she has danced, nor as deadpan as that of Keely Garfield, with whom she shares certain concerns, like a fondness for brides’ veils and fey, courageous heroines. Et voila! Just in time for Gay Pride weekend, a female superhero (Hilary Easton) bursts through the door in a star-shaped spotlight!

To receive the complete article, first published on July 10, 2002, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $109 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com.

Art for what ails you: Munch @ Breuer

The Sick ChildAmong the 43 compositions rarely exhibited in the U.S. on view at the Met Breuer in New York from November 15 through February 4 for Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed is the 1907 oil on canvas “The Sick Child,” measuring 118.7 x 121 cm. Painting from the collection of the Tate Modern, London. EM.024. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo © Munch Museum. © Tate, London 2015. Courtesy the Met.

Schussing the Korper with Sasha Waltz

By Nancy Dalva
Copyright 2002, 2017 Nancy Dalva

NEW YORK — Sasha Waltz’s “Korper” — which traveled from its home theater, Berlin’s Schaubuhne am Lehniner Platz, to the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s 20th Next Wave Festival last week — really does feel like something new, or rather, something neo. This is what German expressionism looks like in the 21st century: a fusion form, as much deconstructed as constructed, but reliant on the German past for its root images and its ur-meanings, as I intuit them. “Korper” — which means body, and which is about the body — is a 90-minute ensemble piece with an international cast of 13. It unfolds with an eerie lack of tone. The funny, the tragic, the weird, the obscure, the preposterous — they’re all given the same weight, which gives the piece the look of surrealism and the feeling of a dream.

To receive the complete article, first published on November 19, 2002, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check. Subscribers receive full access to the DI Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $109 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com.