The Chevalier de la Barre, 11-28: Things that keep me up at 4 in the morning, or, why Judson’s work is far from done

momajudson alligator small

From the exhibition Judson Dance Theater: The Work is Never Done, running at the Museum of Modern Art through February 3: Al Giese’s photograph of Rudy Perez and Elaine Summers performing “Take Your Alligator with You,” 1963. Performed at Concert of Dance #7, Judson Memorial Church, New York, June 24, 1963. © Estate of Al Giese/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

By Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2018 Paul Ben-Itzak

In an era where the man with the most prized pulpit in the world is calling legitimate news fake, you’d think that publicists would be more judicious before employing hyperbole. You’d also think that the scholars and scientists employed by the world’s number one institution of modern art — where scholarship and the historical accuracy this implies should be primed — would take a look at the press releases before they’re sent out.

And yet there it is, on the first page of the Museum of Modern Art’s ‘expanded’ release for its exhibition Judson Dance Theater: the Work is Never Done, running through February 3 in New York:

“Redefining the kinds of movement that could count as dance, the Judson artists would go on to profoundly shape all fields of art in the second half of the 20th century.”

For the second part of this preposterous proclamation, I have one question: Where’s your proof?

For the first part the statement,  I can only concur with the second part of the exhibition’s title: Indeed, the work is never done.

URGENT: JOURNALIST/TRADUCTEUR AMÉRICAIN CHERCHE SOUS-LOCATION OU ÉCHANGE BONS PROCÉDÉS (LOGEMENT CONTRE TRAVAIL) EN RÉGION PARISIENNE POUR JANVIER-FÉVRIER-MARS

paul photo paris apartment

Journaliste et traducteur américain expérimenté, basé en Dordogne, cherche logement Parisien pour janvier-février-mars, pour pouvoir écrire sur la scène artistique parisienne. Sous-location ou échange des bons procédés logement – travail (Comm., gérance sites web, Traduction fr. – ang., Rédaction, Consultation art/s, Dramaturgie, DJ, pub sur mes sites: the Maison de Traduction et the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager, etcetera).  Références si besoin. Voici quelques infos me concernant (et sur mes multiples talents et atouts). Merci de me contacter  par mail a l’une des addressses suivant: paulbenitzak@gmail.com ou artsvoyager@gmail.com.

Schnabel in the Ring at the Orsay

Schnabel Tina in a matador hat smallJulian Schnabel, “Tina in a Matador Hat,” 1987. Oil, broken plates and Bondo on wood, 182.9 x 152.4 x 18 cm. Bischofberger Collection, Männedorf-Zurich, Switzerland, Inv. GBB No. 5027. © Julian Schnabel Studio / Photo by Phillips/Schwab. Featured in the exhibition “The Orsay as viewed by Julian Schnabel,” on view at the Paris museum through January 13. See below for more information.

20 years of telling stories not told elsewhere: Here’s a work I don’t ‘like.’ Which doesn’t mean it’s bad.

By Chris Dohse
Copyright 2005, 2018 Chris Dohse

(To receive the complete article, first published on October 14, 2005, subscribers please e-mail paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for one year for just $36/year or $21 or Euros for students, as attested to by a copy of your student I.D., by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check, and receive full access to all new articles plus our 20-year archive of 2000 reviews by 150 critics of performances and art exhibits on five continents.)

Schnabel, in exile at the Orsay

Schnabel The Exile Small

If one didn’t know it was 2018 in Paris, one might think it was 1985 in Greenwich Village, with what with Basquiat taking over the private Musée Louis Vuitton and his biographer Julian Schnabel invited to juxtapose his work with that of Van Gogh and Cezanne, Manet and Courbet in “The Orsay as seen by Julian Schnabel,” running through January 13. While we’re usually sceptical about such pairings — which seem to reflect more classic museums’ nervousness that even the Impressionists won’t sell without a modern angle to juice them up than any legitimate aesthetic scheme — with Schnabel it actually works, particularly when the New Yorker dialogues with the Dutchman Van Gogh. Both artists reflect a poverty-informed discomfort with their spendthrift eras. And neither is locked into his times. Besides its qualities as collage, Schnabel’s canvas “Exile” is a reminder that exiles come in all colors and stripes. Julian Schnabel, “Exile.” Oil and buck’s antler on wood. 228.6 x 304.8 cm. Männerdorf-Zurich, Courtesy Galerie Bruno Bichofberger, Inv. GBB No. 15325. © Julian Schnabel Studio / Photo by Phillips/Schwab.

Building the dance audience: Rat-faced Bastards in the Kitchen with Michelson

By Chris Dohse
Copyright 2003, 2018 Chris Dohse

(To receive the complete article, first published on April 18, 2003, subscribers please e-mail paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the DI for one year for just $36/year or $21 or Euros for students, as attested to by a copy of your student I.D., by designating your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check, and receive full access to all new articles plus our 20-year archive of 2000 reviews by 150 critics of performances and art exhibits on five continents.