Liberty for all

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On view at the Art Institute of Chicago through August 20, as part of its exhibition Robert Frank: Photos is, above, Robert Frank. Untitled, 2005/14. The Art Institute of Chicago, promised gift of Ralph and Nancy Segall. © Robert Frank, from the book “Partida.” Courtesy of Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York.

The DI, Year 2: New History — Hassabi, McCloud, & Alenikoff at Judson

By Peggy H. Cheng
Copyright 2002, 2017 Peggy H. Cheng

NEW YORK — Last night at the historic Judson Church, Movement Research presented three choreographers with three very different histories: Maria Hassabi (in collaboration with two other performers, Luciana Achugar and Jenny Argyriou), Tamieca McCloud, and Frances Alenikoff. Hassabi, who was born in Cyprus, graduated from CalArts in 1994 and has since danced with various “downtown” choreographers in New York City. McCloud, Pilobolus alumnae, grew up in New Jersey and attended Rutgers where she played rugby and double-majored in dance and literature. Alenikoff, who celebrated her 80th birthday last August, was a founding member of Dance Theater Workshop and is an ongoing creative force who has been written about by dance artist Kenneth King in his essay, “Dancing Legend, the Art of Frances Alenikoff.”

To receive the rest of the article, first published on April 3, 2002, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. Subscribe before the end of the day Monday, July 17 for just $19.95. Just designate your PayPal payment to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to find out about payment by check or in Euros.

 

Musical comedy focus: ‘It’s Great to Be Alive’ in a manless world, baby, at MoMA

moma alive smallNewly preserved by the Museum of Modern Art from a unique nitrate print in the museum’s collection, Alfred Werker’s rollicking pre-Code musical comedy “It’s Great to Be Alive” (1933), above, produced by the Fox Film Corporation, is set in a near future where every man on Earth has succumbed to the fatal disease of “masculitis.” As Edna Mae Oliver leads a team of female scientists in a desperate attempt to create an artificial man, one lone male — an aviator, played by the Brazilian star Raúl Roulien — is discovered living on a tropical island. Returned to civilization, he becomes an object of hot contention, claimed by his fiancée (Gloria Stuart — who’d portray the aged Rose in James Cameron’s “Titanic” 64 years later) but kidnapped by a gangster (Dorothy Burgess) who plans to auction him off to the highest bidder. Final showing tonight at 7 p.m. at MoMa in New York City. Image courtesy MoMA.

The DI, Year 1: Eiko & Koma at the American Dance Festival — ‘When Nights Were Dark’

By Byron Woods
Copyright 2000, 2017 Byron Woods

DURHAM, NC — Lyrical, mythic, elusive, and sidereal — let those potent adjectives start the description of “When Nights Were Dark,” Eiko and Koma’s fantastic evening-length work whose expanded version premiered at Durham’s American Dance Festival this week. In this new book of slow and subtle changes, the duo took a mostly willing audience into a different time zone, as usual.

To receive an e-mailed copy of the complete article, first published on June 23, 2000, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($99 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1999 through 2015. Just designate your PayPal payment in that amount to paulbenitzak@gmail.com , or write us at that address to find out about payment by check or in Euros. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $99 (institutions) Contact Paul at paulbenitzak@gmail.com .