Cynthia Loemij, Superstar: All-Reich from De Keersmaeker & Rosas in Paris

rosas-finalCynthia Loemij, left, and Tale Dolven of Rosas in Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s “Piano Phase.” Herman Sorgeloos photo copyright Herman Sorgeloos and courtesy Rosas and Theatre de la Ville.

Copyright 2007, 2016 Paul Ben-Itzak

Originally published May 3, 2007. Sponsored by Slippery Rock University Dance and Donna Scro Samori / Freespace Dance.

PARIS — There are certain dances that, simply put, justify Dance. Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s 1982 “Fase,” an excerpt of which ATDK’s company Rosas performed in last night’s Theatre de la Ville – Sarah Bernhardt opening of an all Steve Reich program, is one of those landmark works.

To get the rest of the article, subscribers can contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015 — including reviews of the work of Rosas and De Keersmaeker from New York, Paris, London, San Francisco, Brussels, Antwerp, and Vienna. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .

The DI Interview: Sandstrom interviews Elkins

di-elkins-with-text

To get the rest of the interview,   first published on November 29, 2006, subscribers please contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at paulbenitzak@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Subscribe to the Dance Insider  and Arts Voyager for just $36/year and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. Just designate your payment to paulbenitzak@gmail.com, or write us at that address to learn how to pay by check.

Rauschenberg’s ‘Pelican’ flies again at MoMA

moma-danse-smallPlan ahead: From the Museum of Modern Art’s Robert Rauschenberg exhibition, opening May 21, 2017 and running through September 4: Peter Moore, performance view of Robert Rauschenberg’s Pelican, 1963. Photo © Barbara Moore/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York.

In permanence at the Art Institute of Chicago: Roy Lichtenstein, Artist’s Studio “Foot Medication,” 1974

chicago-licht-smallAmong the stunning work on view in the Art Institute of Chicago’s ongoing exhibition The New Contemporary: Roy Lichtenstein,  Artist’s Studio “Foot Medication,” 1974. The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Edlis/Neeson Collection. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein and courtesy The Art Institute of Chicago.

Flash Flashback, 9-15: Shadows of our Remembered Ancestors ‘Labor Union’ Works it; Workum and Rawls Paint the Ark

By Alison D’Amato
Copyright 2007, 2016 Alison D’Amato

(Originally published February 15, 2007.)

NEW YORK — For an art form that’s barely a century old, modern dance often appears obsessed with its own legacy. Maybe that’s because our ranks are so slim, the branches of our family tree still so close to its roots; most dancers my age (which is an admittedly green 26) have had, and probably also adored, a teacher who danced with Trisha Brown or Merce Cunningham. We can often even trace ourselves, perhaps through the teacher of a teacher, to Martha Graham herself. It’s empowering to feel a part of that history, and crucial to understand it. The trouble is, the closeness of it is often overwhelming enough to keep a young choreographer from finding her own voice. While innovation is often singled out as the ultimate mark of choreographic achievement, some dance makers choose to address that fact as problematic, and reincorporate the past as something all their own. Two pairs of such dance makers appeared on a split bill at Dance Theater Workshop last weekend. One of those calls themselves “The Labor Union,” and is manned by co-creators Isabel Lewis and Erika Hand. The other is made up of Katie Workum and Will Rawls.

To get the rest of the article, subscribers can contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .

“Bill T. Jones, Los Angeles, 1995,” by Herb Ritts

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Did anyone popularize post-modern dance in the 1990s — and simultaneously prove its *relevance* by using its language to address contemporary concerns, singularly making dance a player in so-called ‘identity politics’ — as much as Bill T. Jones? No surprise, then, that Jones found a photographer to match his mettle in popular appeal in Herb Ritts, who once said, “If we look to the past, (for example) at Paul Outerbridge and Man Ray, many of their best photographs started out as commercial assignments.” Ritts’s singular portrait (above), “Bill T. Jones, Los Angeles, 1995” is among the iconic Ritts oeuvres on view at the Maison Européenne de la Photographie of the City of Paris September 10 through October 15. Copyright Herb Ritts Foundation. 

Flash Flashback, 9-8: Still Re-born: Jones/Zane Looks Back and Finds You Can’t Go Home Again

By Chris Dohse
Copyright 2003 Chris Dohse

(Originally published September 12, 2003.)

NEW YORK — This isn’t the first time I’ve found myself disagreeing with history. Or remembering it differently. I mean, I was there, dancing and making dances at the end of the 1970s and into the 1980s. Not in SoHo, not even in New York (though I did starve through a winter here), but I remember what concerns influenced me and the dancers I knew then. What compositional choices we made; what styles fascinated us. Surely if we, many of whom are still members of the pomo dance so-called “community,” gazed into our ’80s navel, what would we find? Bill T. Jones, of course. Inescapably the bellwether of a generation of dancemakers who collided East Village performance and the ’60s avant-garde lineage into talking, gestural, identity-specific, polemical formalism.

To get the rest of the article, subscribers can contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .

Flash Flashback, 9-7: Show Not Tell With Munisteri at P.S. 122

By Tom Patrick
Copyright 2000, 2016 Tom Patrick

(Originally published January 28, 2000.)

NEW YORK — Tonight I got to witness a terrifically refreshing concert: Ben Munisteri and company in “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” at P.S. 122. I had absolutely no idea what to expect in terms of movement or outlook, nor am I now in the least disappointed to say I still wouldn’t classify the choreographer or the work I saw. I didn’t come away with an impression of Mr. Munisteri himself, really, but more like a sparked curiosity….

To get the rest of the article, subscribers can contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions) gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. You can also purchase a complete copy of the Archives for just $49 (individuals) or $129 (institutions) Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .

Flash Flashback, 9-6: Battling the Dark Spaces In a World of Conflict, Gerard Violette & Padmini Chettur See Another Path

chetturPadmini Chettur’s “Paperdoll.” Photo by and copyright Jirka Jansch, courtesy Theatre de la Ville.

By Paul Ben-Itzak
Copyright 2006, 2016 Paul Ben-Itzak

Well darkness has a hunger that’s insatiable
And lightness has a call that’s hard to hear
I wrap my fear around me like a blanket
I sailed my ship of safety till I sank it, I’m crawling on your shore.
— Indigo Girls, “Closer to Fine”

(Originally published October 27, 2006.)

PARIS — As inevitable as conflict may seem these days, the world offers choices. Gerard Violette, artistic director of the Theatre de la Ville — arguably the most critical dance presenter in the world — and its two auditoriums, closes his season-opening greetings in this year’s program brochure by quoting from Albert Jacquard’s “My Utopia” (Stock): “Nowadays, most encounters are opportunities for confrontation, struggle, prize-listing. Yet, nothing matters but the possibility to exchange. It is our view of the other that must be transformed. We must no longer consider him as competition…. What I would like to say is you may become what you choose to be. And that other people’s happiness concurs to build one’s own.” To which Violette adds: “‘Other views, exchange, other people’s happiness….’ You’re in a theater.” I read this Wednesday night sitting in TDLV’s 380-seat les Abbesses theater up near the sky in Montmartre, where Padmini Chettur immediately proved the precept in “Paperdoll.”

To get the rest of the article, subscribers can contact publisher Paul Ben-Itzak at artsvoyager@gmail.com. Not a subscriber? Complete articles are $5 or three for $10. Subscribe to the Dance Insider for just $29.95/year ($119 for institutions gets full access for all your teachers, students, dance company members, etc.) and receive full access to our Dance Insider Archive of 2,000 exclusive reviews by 150 leading dance critics of performances on five continents from 1998 through 2015. Contact Paul at artsvoyager@gmail.com .